MidAmerica Orthopaedics Blog

A Guide to Total Knee Replacement - Available at MidAmerica’s Palos Hills & Mokena Locations

If you are plagued with chronic knee pain and impaired knee function to the point you can’t perform daily activities, such as walking or climbing the stairs, you may have considered total knee replacement. Furthermore if walking supports, medications, and physical therapy have not sufficiently managed pain and improved function, total knee replacement may be your next step. Although knee arthroplasty is referred to as knee replacement, it can be seen more as “knee resurfacing”, as only the surface of the bone is replaced. The first total knee replacement surgery was performed in 1968, and since then surgical techniques have vastly improved. Today, total knee replacement is considered one of the most successful procedures in medicine and is available at any of the MidAmerica locations, including Palos Hills & Mokena.

Risk Factors, Symptoms, and Treatment Options for Bunions.

Author: Phil Ghuneim – Workers’ Compensation Coordinator/ Corporate Communication Manager

Another of the most common conditions which Dr. Svetlana Zats treats, is Hallux Valgus- or more commonly known as, Bunions. A Bunion refers to a deformity of the Metatarsophalangeal joint (MTP) that causes a visible protuberance to develop where the big toe meets the foot. This bump, in turn, forces the big toe to deviate inward toward the other toes. When the condition is on the side of the little toe, it’s referred to as Bunionette Deformity (or “Tailor’s Bunion”).

Risk Factors, Symptoms, and Treatment Options for Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar Fasciitis

Author: Phil Ghuneim – Workers’ Compensation Coordinator/ Corporate Communication Manager

In Honor of Dr. Svetlana Zats joining the MidAmerica team, let’s take a look at one of the most common conditions that a Foot and Ankle Specialist, like herself, is able to treat.

Plantar Fasciitis

Colloquially known as ‘Policeman’s Heel,’ plantar fasciitis refers to an inflammation of the thick tissues extending from your heel to your toes. These tissues, known as the plantar fascia, play a crucial role in supporting the arc and extension of the foot. If the condition becomes chronic, fibers of the plantar fascia can start to degenerate. This can lead to partial or complete plantar fascia ruptures.