Hip Pain

Hip Anatomy

The hip joint is one of the largest weight-bearing joints in the body. This ball-and-socket joint allows the leg to move and rotate while keeping the body stable and balanced.

The hip joints are versatile joints. They support your body while allowing you to perform a wide range of activities. Because the hip joints bear such a heavy load, they are vulnerable to injury and to osteoarthritis.

Learn more about Hip Joint Anatomy

Patient Education

MidAmerica believes that patient education is vital to providing the highest quality care for hip pain.

Click on a title of a common hip pain condition to learn more.

Causes of Hip Pain

The most common cause of chronic hip pain and disability is arthritis. Osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and traumatic arthritis are the most common forms of this disease.

CLICK A HEADING TO LEARN MORE ABOUT EACH CONDITION.

Osteoarthritis (Degenerative Joint Disease)

This is an age-related "wear and tear" type of arthritis. It usually occurs in people 50 years of age and older and often in individuals with a family history of arthritis. The cartilage cushioning the bones of the hip wears away. The bones then rub against each other, causing hip pain and stiffness. Osteoarthritis may also be caused or accelerated by subtle irregularities in how the hip developed in childhood.

Rheumatoid Arthritis

This is an autoimmune disease in which the synovial membrane becomes inflamed and thickened. This chronic inflammation can damage the cartilage, leading to pain and stiffness. Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common form of a group of disorders termed "inflammatory arthritis."

Post-traumatic Arthritis

This can follow a serious hip injury or fracture. The cartilage may become damaged and lead to hip pain and stiffness over time.

Avascular Necrosis (Osteonecrosis)

An injury to the hip, such as a dislocation or fracture, may limit the blood supply to the femoral head. This is called avascular necrosis. The lack of blood may cause the surface of the bone to collapse, and arthritis will result. Some diseases can also cause avascular necrosis.

Childhood Hip Disease

Some infants and children have hip problems. Even though the problems are successfully treated during childhood, they may still cause arthritis later on in life. This happens because the hip may not grow normally, and the joint surfaces are affected.

Total Hip Replacement

In a total hip replacement (also called total hip arthroplasty), the damaged bone and cartilage is removed and replaced with prosthetic components.

The damaged femoral head is removed and replaced with a metal stem that is placed into the hollow center of the femur. The femoral stem may be either cemented or "press fit" into the bone.

A metal or ceramic ball is placed on the upper part of the stem. This ball replaces the damaged femoral head that was removed. The damaged cartilage surface of the socket (acetabulum) is removed and replaced with a metal socket. Screws or cement are sometimes used to hold the socket in place.

A plastic, ceramic, or metal spacer is inserted between the new ball and the socket to allow for a smooth gliding surface.

Patient Testimonial
Don't take our word for it. Listen to what our patients have to say!

George Schleyer, a 55-year-old father of three and grandfather of 2, shares how Dr. Bedikian helped him get relief from hip pain and return to an active lifestyle.

When an Injury Occurs

Direct To Specialist The First Time

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